Posts tagged with UCL Institute of Child Health

GOSH patient Rhys

In 2001, at just nine months old, Rhys became one of the first people in the world to be treated with gene therapy at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH).

Demi

A clinical study by Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) has shown encouraging results in treating a type of neuromuscular disease known as Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome (BVVL) with the vitamin riboflavin.

Section of affected pituitary showing tumour in red (star) and mutated cells in green. Orange cells with arrowheads secrete signals that trigger the growth of the tumour

A type of pituitary tumour known as craniopharyngioma appears to form via a different mechanism to that thought to occur in more common tumours, according to a paper from the UCL Institute of Child Health, Great Ormond Street Hospital’s research partner.

Muscle

The possibility of using animal parts to overcome human organ shortages moves one step closer to realisation following the successful transplant of rabbit skeletal muscle tissue into rats, by a team led by Great Ormond Street Hospital’s research partner the UCL Institute of Child Health.

UCL Institute of Child Health’s Dr Paolo De Coppi, lead author of the study

A faster and more effective method of preparing organs for transplant has been successfully tested by a team led by Great Ormond Street Hospital’s research partner the UCL Institute of Child Health.

Dr Nadia Micali

The number of people diagnosed with eating disorders has increased by 15 per cent since 2000, according to a new study led by Great Ormond Street Hospital’s research partner, the UCL Institute of Child Health (ICH).

Amniotic fluid stem cells integrate in the gut

Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is the most common gastrointestinal surgical emergency in newborns, with mortality rates of around 15 to 30 per cent in the UK. But thanks to a study, funded by Great Ormond Street Hospital Children’s Charity, and led by the UCL Institute of Child Health, there may be hope of a future treatment for the condition where severe inflammation destroys tissue in the gut.

lead investigator of the study, Dr Elina Hypponen

A new study led by Great Ormond Street Hospital’s research partner the UCL Institute of Child Health (ICH) has discovered that obesity can lead to a lack of vitamin D circulating in the body. Efforts to tackle obesity should therefore also help to reduce levels of vitamin D deficiency in the population, says the lead investigator of the study, Dr Elina Hypponen.

Lab pipetting

A team of scientists, led by Professor Francesco Muntoni of the UCL Institute of Child Health, have won a grant to develop and test a drug treatment for boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD).

The study will assess the safety and tolerability of the new drug in 12 children with DMD. “This funding is excellent news for the DMD community,” says Prof Muntoni, who explains that this approach could work for at least 70 per cent of DMD sufferers.

HRH The Princess Royal at the opening of Europe’s first research centre to battle birth defects

HRH The Princess Royal attended the official opening of the Newlife Birth Defects Research Centre (BDRC), last Thursday, 25 October 2012. The centre is based at the UCL Institute of Child Health (ICH), Great Ormond Street Hospital’s research partner.

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